Submit to DeliciousSubmit to DiggSubmit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

If a photo is a snapshot in time and the written word is timeless, wouldn't thoroughly describing your photos and your vision speak volumes? Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is advertised everywhere on the Internet. The fact of the matter is that you can do it yourself on your website. Photographers need to get into the habit of doing a couple simple things when putting their pictures online to take advantage of search engines. Unless your name is Scott Kelby, Jeremy Cowart or Chase Jarvis, you may need a little help getting noticed on the Internet.

Picture of cow in creek

Cow in Creek Southern Indiana - Photographer - Rebecca Devereaux 2010 

  1. Always name your photo. Be specific and do not use the name that your camera has given. There should be no images named “_mg_1508.jpg” on the Internet. If your picture is a picture of a cow in a creek, name the picture “cow-in-creek.jpg.” Search engines do not have eyes and cannot see your picture but they can read! KISS (Keep it Simple Stupid)
  2. Always use alt attributes on photos. If you do not know what this is, let me explain. HTML code is simple. When you look at the code of a picture, basic code looks like this: <img src=”http://www.yoursite.com/images/cow-in-creek.jpg”>.  To add the alt attribute feature it should look like this: <img alt=”Cow in Creek Picture” src=”http://www.yoursite.com/images/cow-in-creek.jpg”> If for some reason that you photo is unavailable. The spot will still be filled with the alt attributes. Search engines pull text not photos. Use clear alt attributes for photos. Again if it is a cow in creek photo, use alt=”Cow in Creek.”
  3. Always add descriptions to your photos. Adobe Lightroom and most photo editing software have features that allows you to add descriptive information to your photo in the Meta data section. USE it!  Again, search engines do not have eyes to see your photo but they can read the description.
  4. Keywords. Do a keyword search on Google before you add keywords to your photo. You will be surprised. I put in “cow in creek” “photography” and “photo.” So how do I read these statistics: I stay away from keywords like “photography” and “photo” because I have too much competition for those photos. To keep my picture in the top searches I use keywords like: “cow in creek” which only has a 3% competition. I would actually add the location of the picture and describe the cow. This will broaden your search placement! Example keywords: cow in creek, Corydon Indiana, black cow with white face, black cow in water

    Keyword

    Competition

    Global Monthly Searches

     

    cow in creek

    -

    -

    -

     

    photography

    0.25

    16600000

    11100000

     

    photo

    0.34

    68000000

    16600000

     

    digital photography

    0.44

    368000

    201000

     

    famous photographers

    0.24

    110000

    74000

     

    stock photography

    0.85

    135000

    74000

     

    types of photography

    0.09

    14800

    9900

     

    photography jobs

    0.67

    110000

    49500

     

    photo editor

    0.35

    1220000

    450000

     

    national geographic

    0.25

    3350000

    1500000

     

    photography tips

    0.33

    165000

    74000

     

    popular photography

    0.41

    22200

    14800

     

    cow creek

    0.03

    5400

    5400

     

    photo editing

    0.45

    1000000

    450000

     

  5. Another great tip is to title your web pages appropriately. Example: My site name is RebeccaDevereaux.com, because it is my site. Each of my pages is titled with “Rebecca Devereaux” but add a dash plus the title of the article. If you are on my page, you will see the title in your web browser. “Rebecca Devereaux – SEO for Photographers” I am highlighting an article I wrote and want to name the title to allow for better search engine placement. This is a simple HTML sample:

                <html>

                <head>

                <title=”Rebecca Devereaux – Cow in Creek”></title>

                </head>

                <body>

                </body>

                </html>

  6. Another great tip is to not use FLASH! Flash is great way to protect your photos from being stolen but it is NOT search engine or mobile phone friendly! There are other resources that can be used to disallow right clicking to steal photos.
  7. Add captions to your photos directly under or just above the picture. Even if it is just to add the title again and the name of the photographer. For example: “Cow in Creek” photographer Rebecca Devereaux 2010.

This is just a small list of things to do to get your photos noticed. Good practices are always good habits it get into. Good luck and I hope to see your photos soon.

Submit to DeliciousSubmit to DiggSubmit to FacebookSubmit to Google PlusSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn